NAHA Health is here to help during COVID-19

Tuesday, March 23 is American Diabetes Association Alert Day®. The Association encourages the public to take the Diabetes Risk Test, as well as sharing the test with everyone they care about.
Tuesday, March 23 is American Diabetes Association Alert Day®. This is a one-day, “wake-up call” where the Association encourages the public to take the Diabetes Risk Test, as well as sharing the test with everyone they care about. Every person that takes the test and knows their risk, helps the Association get closer to stopping diabetes.

In the U.S. alone, 3.2 million people suffer from some form of diabetes, but there are many more undiagnosed cases.

The number is staggering. If you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, you can prevent or at least delay it! Most of the things you should do are things we all should do to live a clean and health lifestyle.

  • Lose weight and keep it off. Speak with your physician to determine what your ideal weight is. Weight control is an important part of diabetes prevention. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose between 10 to 20 pounds. And once you lose the weight, it is important that you don’t gain it back.
  • Follow a healthy eating plan. Work with your doctor and a nutritionist to find out which foods will most benefit you. It is important to reduce the number of calories you eat and drink each day, so you can lose weight and keep it off. To do that, your diet should include smaller portions and less fat and sugar. You should also eat a variety of foods from each food group, including plenty of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. It’s also a good idea to limit red meat and avoid processed meats.
  • Get regular exercise. Exercise has many health benefits, including helping you to lose weight and lower your blood sugar levels. These lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Always talk with your health care professional before you begin any exercise routine, to figure out which types of exercise are best for you. You can start slowly and work up to your goal.
  • Don’t smoke. Smoking can contribute to insulin resistance, which can lead to type 2 diabetes. If you already smoke, try to quit.

Eating and living in a healthy manner will help prevent diabetes and make you feel better overall. You’ll have more energy and have a greater sense of overall wellbeing.

REMEMBER

Know your risk! If you are concerned you may have diabetes (type 2) take this quiz from The American Diabetes Association. If you are unable to take the quiz March 23, don’t worry, the quiz is available all year long.

We want to hear from you, share your results with your Case Manager if you have questions or concerns. We’ll help you reach your healthy living goals.